175

2019

netflix

Your Honor - Netflix

Your Honor follows the son of a respected judge who is involved in a hit and run. Soon after they are both drawn into a high-stakes game of lies, deceit and impossible choices when it comes to light that the victim was the son of a notorious crime boss.

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Your Honor - The Wall - Netflix

The Wall is the eleventh studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released as a double album on 30 November 1979 in the United Kingdom by Harvest Records and in the United States by Columbia Records. Bassist and songwriter Roger Waters conceived the album as a rock opera during Pink Floyd's 1977 In the Flesh Tour, when his frustration with the audience became so acute that he spat on them. Its story explores Pink, a jaded rockstar character that Waters modeled after himself and the band's original leader Syd Barrett. Pink's life begins with the loss of his father during the Second World War and continues with abuse from his schoolteachers, an overprotective mother, and the breakdown of his marriage; all contribute to his eventual self-imposed isolation from society, symbolised by a wall. The band, who were then struggling with personal and financial difficulties, supported the idea. Recording lasted from December 1978 to November 1979, with stops in France, England, New York, and Los Angeles. Waters enlisted Canadian producer Bob Ezrin, who helped refine the concept and bridge worsening band tensions; keyboardist Richard Wright was fired by Waters during production, but stayed as a salaried musician, making The Wall the last album recorded with the 11-year-spanning line-up of Waters, Wright, guitarist David Gilmour, and drummer Nick Mason. From 1980 to 1981, Pink Floyd staged The Wall as a live tour featuring elaborate theatrical effects. Upon its release, The Wall initially received a mixed response from critics, but was a commercial success, reaching number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and topping the US Billboard 200 for 15 weeks. It became the band's second best-selling album, one of the best-selling albums of all time, and one of the most well-known concept albums of all time, and was adapted into a feature film directed by Alan Parker. By 1999, the album had sold over 23 million RIAA-certified units (11.5 million albums), making it the third-highest certified album in the United States. It produced three singles: “Run Like Hell”, “Comfortably Numb”, and the band's only number-one single “Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2”. Some of the album's themes would be continued in the band's next album The Final Cut (1983), which also contains some outtakes from The Wall. In 2003, Rolling Stone placed The Wall at number 87 on its list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. Waters staged a new Wall live tour from 2010 to 2013, which became the highest-grossing tour by a solo musician.

Your Honor - Recording - Netflix

The album was recorded digitally (one of the first) in several locations. In France, Super Bear Studios was used between January and July 1979, with Waters recording his vocals at the nearby Studio Miraval. Michael Kamen supervised the orchestral arrangements at CBS Studios in New York, in September. Over the next two months the band used Cherokee Studios, Producers Workshop and The Village Recorder in Los Angeles. A plan to work with the Beach Boys at the Sundance Productions studio in Los Angeles was cancelled. For a week in November they worked at the Producers Workshop. James Guthrie, recommended by previous Floyd collaborator Alan Parsons, arrived early in the production process. He replaced engineer Brian Humphries, emotionally drained by his five years with the band. Guthrie was hired as a co-producer, but was initially unaware of Ezrin's role: “I saw myself as a hot young producer ... When we arrived, I think we both felt we'd been booked to do the same job.” The early sessions at Britannia Row were emotionally charged, as Ezrin, Guthrie and Waters each had strong ideas about the direction the album would take. Relations within the band were at a low ebb, and Ezrin's role expanded to that of an intermediary between Waters and the rest of the band. As Britannia Row was initially regarded as inadequate for The Wall the band upgraded much of its equipment, and by March another set of demos were complete. However, their former relationship with NWG placed them at risk of bankruptcy, and they were advised to leave the UK by no later than 6 April 1979, for a minimum of one year. As non-residents they would pay no UK taxes during that time, and within a month all four members and their families had left. Waters moved to Switzerland, Mason to France, and Gilmour and Wright to the Greek Islands. Some equipment from Britannia Row was relocated in Super Bear Studios near Nice. Gilmour and Wright were each familiar with the studio and enjoyed its atmosphere, having recorded there during the production of their solo albums. While Wright and Mason lived at the studio, Waters and Gilmour stayed in nearby houses. Mason later moved into Waters's villa near Vence, while Ezrin stayed in Nice.

Ezrin's poor punctuality caused problems with the tight schedule dictated by Waters. Mason found the producer's behaviour “erratic”, but used his elaborate and unlikely excuses for his lateness as ammunition for “tongue-in-cheek resentment”. Ezrin's share of the royalties was less than the rest of the band and he viewed Waters as a bully, especially when Waters mocked him by having badges made that read NOPE (No Points Ezrin), alluding to his lesser share. Ezrin later said he had marital problems and was not “in the best shape emotionally”. More problems became apparent when Waters's relationship with Wright broke down. The band were rarely in the studio together. Ezrin and Guthrie spliced Mason's previously recorded drum tracks together, and Guthrie also worked with Waters and Gilmour during the day, returning at night to record Wright's contributions. Wright, worried about the effect that the introduction of Ezrin would have on the band's internal relationships, was keen to have a producer's credit on the album (their albums up to that point had always stated “Produced by Pink Floyd”). Waters agreed to a trial period with Wright producing, after which he was to be given a producer's credit, but after a few weeks he and Ezrin expressed dissatisfaction with the keyboardist's methods. A confrontation with Ezrin led to Wright working only at nights. Gilmour also expressed his annoyance, complaining that Wright's lack of input was “driving us all mad”, and Ezrin later reflected: “it sometimes felt that Roger was setting him up to fail. Rick gets performance anxiety. You have to leave him alone to freeform, to create ...” Wright had his own problems, a failing marriage and the onset of depression, exacerbated by his non-residency. The band's holidays were booked for August, after which they were to reconvene at Cherokee Studios in Los Angeles, but Columbia offered the band a better deal in exchange for a Christmas release of the album. Waters therefore increased the band's workload accordingly, booking time at the nearby Studio Miraval. He also suggested recording in Los Angeles ten days earlier than agreed, and hiring another keyboardist to work alongside Wright, whose keyboard parts had not yet been recorded. Wright, however, refused to cut short his family holiday in Rhodes. Accounts of Wright's subsequent departure from the band differ. In his autobiography, Inside Out, Mason says that Waters called O'Rourke, who was travelling to the US on the QE2, and told him to have Wright out of the band by the time Waters arrived in LA to mix the album. In another version recorded by a later historian of the band, Waters called O'Rourke and asked him to tell Wright about the new recording arrangements, to which Wright allegedly responded: “Tell Roger to fuck off ...” Wright disagreed with this recollection, stating that the band had agreed to record only through the spring and early summer, and that he had no idea they were so far behind schedule. Mason later wrote that Waters was “stunned and furious”, and felt that Wright was not doing enough to help complete the album. Gilmour was on holiday in Dublin when he learnt of Waters's ultimatum, and tried to calm the situation. He later spoke with Wright and gave him his support, but reminded him about his minimal contribution to the album. Waters, however, insisted that Wright leave, or he would refuse to release The Wall. Several days later, worried about their financial situation, and the failing interpersonal relationships within the band, Wright quit. News of his departure was kept from the music press. Although his name did not appear anywhere on the original album, he was employed as a session musician on the band's subsequent The Wall tour. By August 1979 the running order was largely complete. Wright completed his duties at Cherokee Studios aided by session musicians Peter Wood and Fred Mandel, and Jeff Porcaro played drums in Mason's stead on “Mother”. His duties complete, Mason left the final mix to Waters, Gilmour, Ezrin and Guthrie, and travelled to New York to record his début solo album, Nick Mason's Fictitious Sports. In advance of its release, technical constraints led to some changes being made to the running order and content of The Wall, with “What Shall We Do Now?” being replaced by the similar but shorter “Empty Spaces”, and “Hey You” being moved from its original place at the end of side three, to the beginning. With the November 1979 deadline approaching, the band left the now-incorrect inner sleeves of the album unchanged.

Your Honor - References - Netflix